Our Studies

Online Studies

Bouncing Balls

This study examines how babies use what they see and hear to understand the world around them. The question we are investigating is whether babies can tell whether objects and the sounds that they make belong together. This is not a new question. We have investigated this question before but in a controlled lab setting. Now, we are using Lookit to see if this phenomenon still exists in a new and less controlled environment like your home. To answer our research question, we will measure how much time your baby looks at each of the objects on the screen while listening to an occasional sound.

 

Pop Up Objects

Study Link: Please contact rebecca.canale@yale.edu

Age range: 4-8 years old, adults 18 years or older

This study examines how adults and children track the predictability of objects in their environment. The question we are investigating is twofold: one, how sensitive are adults and children to various levels of predictability and, two, how do these changes affect their ability to learn from their environment. To answer our research question, adults and children will watch a series of short videos in which objects will appear from behind boxes on the screen followed by questions regarding what they watched.

 

Do you find this interesting?

Study Link: Please contact rebecca.canale@yale.edu

Age range: 4 months – 2 years old

This study examines how interested babies are in various short video clips including nature scenes and fireworks displays.  The question we are investigating is whether there is a link between what a baby is interested in looking at and how novel that scene is to them. To answer our research question, infants will watch a series of videos that display images that will be more or less familiar to them.

 

Picture Language Learning

Study Link: https://yalesurvey.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5ot5KTYtNc7hIFL

Age range: adults 18 years or older

Study Description: This study examines how adults learn novel picture languages. The question we are investigating is how well adults can learn a novel picture language in a relatively short period of time. To answer our research question, participants will watch sequences that contain the novel picture language and answer questions about what they’ve learned. This is a two day study.

 


 

In Lab Studies

Update! The LLAMB Lab is currently closed due to COVID-19.

The LLAMB Lab will be following the protocol of the Yale Child Study Center at this time.  Below is a message from the Yale Child study Center:

Our new Yale Medicine/Yale New Haven Health COVID-19 Call Center offers information on how to keep yourself and your family healthy. Health professionals are available to answer your questions, Monday – Friday, 7 am – 7 pm. 203-688-1700.

For more information about Yale’s response to COVID-19, please visit the Actions and Responses to Coronavirus (COVID-19) website.

For more information regarding Yale’s Child Study Center, please visit the Yale Child Study Center Website.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at llamblab@haskins.yale.edu.

Please note: Due to enforced social distancing, we are unable to answer our lab phone at this time.


 

 

Babies’ & Children’s Perception of People’s Talking Faces

Oftentimes, babies and young children find themselves in situations where they see and hear multiple people talking. This could be at a birthday party, a family gathering, or a classroom full of other kids and adults. Regardless of which place they happen to be, they must be able to correctly combine each person’s voice with that person’s face to perceive each person as a unique person. How this ability develops and what specific skills are required for its development is the topic of our current studies (for our previous studies that have led up to the current ones, please see here). To address our main research question, we present different videos of talking faces and simply record how and where your baby or child directs his or her attention! Participation in this study involves no more than a 45-minute visit to the LLAMB Lab.

 

 

NIRS Machine Comparison Study

The technology we use in research is constantly advancing, but sometimes it’s hard to tell which technology is the right fit for the types of questions we’re asking here at the LLAMB Lab. What’s the easiest way to test out what is the best fit for us? Why not compare them side by side! In order to do so, we’re looking at how babies (6-9 months old) process sounds and images using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a safe and noninvasive technique that has been specifically adapted to young babies. The recorded brain responses allow us to measure infants’ reactions to different types of images or sounds, without requiring any active response from them.

Participation in this study would consist of a 1 hour visit (maximum) to the LLAMB Lab. Your child would view and listen to sounds and fun images on a screen while wearing a NIRS recording cap. This cap has a set of LED lights and sensors that record brain responses to what your baby is watching or listening to.

 

Goldilocks NIRS Study

Ever wonder what determines what your baby likes to look at in their visual world? So do we! In order to study this, we look at how long babies (7-8 months old) like to look at novel images that vary in the level of predictability in which they appear. We do this by using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a safe and noninvasive technique that has been specifically adapted to young babies. The recorded brain responses allow us to measure infants’ reactions to different types of images or sounds, without requiring any active response from them.

Participation in this study would consist of a 1 hour visit (maximum) to the LLAMB Lab. Your child would view an exciting array of images on a screen while wearing a NIRS recording cap. This cap has a set of LED lights and sensors that record brain responses to what your baby is watching.

 

Everyday Objects Study

What does brain activity look like when viewing different kinds of objects? In this study, we are looking at patterns of brain activity that characterize a variety of common objects and animals, as well as how these patterns might differ between adults and infants. To do this, we are looking at how both babies (9-12 months old) and adults process fun videos of everyday objects using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), a safe and noninvasive technique that has been specifically adapted to young babies. The recorded brain responses allow us to measure infants’ reactions to different types of images or sounds, without requiring any active response from them.

 

Participation in this study would consist of 3-4 visits to the LLAMB lab, with each session lasting 1 hour maximum. The participant (adult or infant) would view and listen to sounds and fun images on a screen while wearing a NIRS recording cap. This cap has a set of LED lights and sensors that record brain responses to what the participant is watching or listening to.

 

Clownfish Study: Learning Mechanisms in the Developing Brain

Babies are expert learners, and we want to understand how their developing brain manages to take on the world so quickly. In order to do this, we use near-infrared spectroscopy – a safe and noninvasive method – to study the dynamics and localization of their brain activity while they are learning from simple sounds and images.

Participation in this study would consist in a single 1-hour visit (at most) to the LLAMB Lab. Your child would be presented with various sounds and images while seated on your laps, and wearing a little cap comprising a set of sensors to record his/her brain responses. The study itself lasts about 10 to 20 minutes.

 

fMRI Forrest Gump Study** 

What is an fMRI? fMRI stands for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging! That’s a fancy way of saying we use a machine with giant magnets (the scanner) to measure changes in brain activity. More specifically, we have participants lay down on a comfy table that we can put inside the MRI scanner. The scanner will use the magnets inside of it to measure changes in the amount of oxygen in the brain at any given moment during a given task! The recorded changes in the amount of oxygen collected will allow us to study how the brain activates while you or your child is experiencing sounds, images and learning about the world!

Does this hurt? No! fMRI is perfectly safe and this technology has several clinical applications. The machine is designed to be a painless and fun experience.

 

**This study is currently for adults only.